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I’m a known lover of StitchFix.  I love fashion, but the truth is I’m not a fan of shopping.
I never really have been.

When I became a mom, I found myself wearing an assortment of stretched out, pilled v-neck t-shirts on repeat.  I still own most of them, and they are worn often when I’m around the house and doing things, but I found myself in a cycle of blah.
That is an official diagnosis, from me, by the way.

cycle of blah consists of a lot of no make up, a lot of declared pajama days, with the addition of staying inside, dry shampoo, and well, you get the idea.  None of these things are bad in and of themselves, but I wanted to have fun getting ready for the day again.
I really resonated with Dear Abby Leigh’s challengedress for the day you want to have.

Along came StitchFix.

My first fix might still be one of my favorites–I didn’t give a lot of direction, but let my stylist have fun.  In turn, I received items that I would have never picked out–yet I loved them!

Throughout my few many fixes, I’ve learned a few lessons that have helped my stylists get to know me a bit more.
I think they know my style better than I do myself–I’ll get to that in a second.

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  1. Fill out your profile correctly.  When filling out your style profile, continually ask yourself, “am I answering about what I feel comfortable and cute in? Or what I think looks good on other people?”  For example, I love the bohemian look on others, but I really don’t wear it well myself.  Even if it looks good, I don’t feel comfortable in it–it’s just not me.  I found that I had answered some of my style profile not taking this into consideration, so when I received these types of clothes and I wondered why, I was able to see that I had directed my sylist to send me these pieces.   Make sense?  
  2. Use Pinterest!  Even if you’re not a big Pinterest user, create a board for your stylist to see!  Again, be sure to pin items and styles that you could see yourself wearing–if you only like the color, but hate the shirt design, be sure to note that!
  3. Trust your stylist.  I’ve had a few fixes where I’ve sent everything back.  I’m also waiting for my keep-all-five-items, fix.  But I’ve learned throughout my fixes that the less guidance I give, the more I enjoy my fix!  For example, I asked for black pieces in this last fix, but I ended up sending all of those pieces back.  It doesn’t always happen this way, but if you’re going to be specific–be specific.  “I’d like the tulip tunic I saw pictured on Facebook a week ago.”  I tend to give vague direction, while kind of knowing in my head, the specifics, and then I’m disappointed when my mind wasn’t read…go figure!  I’ve given my stylist the go ahead to just have fun with my next fix–I can’t wait to see what you pull together, Margaret!
  4. Be clear in your comments.  When checking out and choosing your keepers, be clear about what you liked and didn’t like.  Each comment helps your stylists learn about you more.  I know sometimes I am rushed to fill it out, but I’ve learned that taking the time to really explain myself is so beneficial!
  5. Try it.  I don’t like lists that end with an even number, so I needed a number five. :)  If you haven’t tried StitchFix, sign up here!

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All of these items pictured were in my last fix!  I almost kept the shorts and the teal top, but in a last minute decision, only the shorts were kept.  The shorts were something added by my stylist–see? She knows me well!

Want to see some of my other fixes from StitchFix?

1 // 2 // 3 // 4 // 5 // 6 //

if you’ve blogged about your fix or have any additional advice that I’m forgetting–leave a comment and let me know!

xo.
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